About Our Timber Cladding

Supplies are limited at the present time, so we are only displaying what we can reasonably obtain, and some items may be on extended lead times compared to normal

What is Timber Cladding?

As the name implies, timber cladding is a method that is utilised to clad buildings or establishments to create a more beautiful finish. Technically, it is meant to protect the walls against moisture and the penetration of air. It is considered an environmentally friendly method and it is becoming popular among architects and builders. Timber cladding is sometimes referred to as weatherboards or weatherboarding.

What does Champion Timber offer?

We offer a large range of different cladding profiles, in a number of different species to suit your requirements. These species include Cedar, virtually free of knots, defects and splits and naturally durable timber. We also have profiles available in Thermowood which is a modified softwood with a double-cycle heat process for maximum durability equivalent to UC4 (suitable to be buried in the ground). Our joinery quality Redwood is a pressure preservative treated to protect against rot and insect attack. Finally, we can also offer Sapele claddings, which is a strong hard-wearing timber, naturally resistant to rot and insect attack.

We offer a free cross-cutting service so we can cut to length any timber you require, to reduce wastage!

If you cannot see what you need, we can machine to order your exact requirement, this takes up to 4 working days. We just need either a sample or a drawing to get us started.

What is better for a shed: Shiplap Cladding or Tongue and Groove Cladding?

Tongue and groove makes a stronger shed, which is harder to break into. Shiplap tongue and groove sheds share many of the same qualities as regular tongue and groove sheds, but the Shiplap has one special feature. Shiplap cladding has a little channel running alongside the timber.

Do you screw or nail shiplap?

Nails are the best options when installing shiplap cladding. Trim nails are faster to install than screws since you do not need to predrill the material and won't be risking causing unsightly splits. They can also be easily covered or touched up if needed.